GOBOB IN THE NEWS


Jun 2016 Wildfire Relief Efforts

Wildfire Relief Efforts Exceeds $15,000 in Membership Donations

Kansas Cattlemen's Association (KCA) membership has donated over $15,000 of cash, goods and services to the victims of the Anderson Creek Wildfire.

KCA has been out in the field discussing losses with members and area agencies. "We have been out and toured through Barber County and down into Oklahoma. Similar to roofers after a hail storm, a few crooked fencing crews have come in and pulled some dirty stunts, but the rebuilding is off and running and seems to be making steady progress," stated KCA Executive Director, Tyler Dupy.

In addition, KCA is distributing a portion of the $10,000 in vouchers donated by Go Bob Pipe and Steel. The $100 certificates are good for any product offered by Go Bob Pipe and Steel. The vouchers were split between those affected in Kansas and Oklahoma.

A special thank you to all that so generously donated. The members and other ranchers affected truly appreciate all of the support they have received during and after the fire. The rebuilding has begun, and the area is expected to recover and be stronger thanks to the help of ranchers like those who stepped up to help when help was needed most.

 

 

Aug 1st, 2016 Roser recieves scholarship from GoBob

Tori Roser of Watonga awarded $1,000 Scholarship

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, July 28, 2016 - Tori Roser, Watonga, Okla. was awarded a $1,000 scholarship during the recent Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association (OCA) Convention and Trade Show. The scholarship was funded by GoBob Pipe and Steel and administered by the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation (OCF), a charitable arm of the OCA. Roser is an incoming freshman currently enrolled at Oklahoma State University with plans to pursue a degree in Animal Science. She is a recent graduate from Watonga High School where she was involved in FFA, speech and drama, band, softball, track and several other community organizations and activities. According to Roser, "I am very excited to find my role in agriculture and help the beef cattle industry in any way that I can." Roser grew up surrounded by agriculture and assisted her father in many ways at the feedyard he manages by washing water tanks, processing cattle, mending fence and record keeping. "It's truly an honor to present young people, like Tori, who have an interest in the beef industry with scholarships to assist in furthering their education," said Jeff Jaronek, OCF Coordinator."Working with partners like GoBob to help fund scholarships allows us to provide additional opportunities to young individuals who have strong roots in the cattle business that we otherwise might not be able to." The Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation was created to provide a charitable trust for the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association and Oklahoma Junior Cattlemen's Association. When you support the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation, you support beef cattle educational programs, research projects in cooperation with Oklahoma State University, educational scholarships for Oklahoma's 4-H and FFA youth and the preservation of the Oklahoma beef cattle industry and its traditions.

 

 

Aug 1st, 2016 Swanson recieves scholarship from GoBob

Jake Swanson of Lawton Awarded $1,000 Scholarship

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, July 28, 2016 - Jake Swanson, Lawton, Okla. was awarded a $1,000 scholarship during the recent Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association (OCA) Convention and Trade Show. The scholarship was funded by GoBob Pipe and Steel and administered by the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation (OCF), a charitable arm of the OCA. Swanson is an incoming freshman currently enrolled at Oklahoma State University with plans to pursue a degree in Business. A recent graduate from Cache High School, Swanson describes himself as a scholar and an athlete. During high school Swanson served as Student Council President and was part of the wrestling program and football team. He was selected to take part in Youth Leadership Oklahoma and the Hugh O'Brien Youth Foundation Leadership Conference. In addition to school activities, Swanson owns his own lawn care business and found it a privilege to work on the family farm. "Our family has been working the land in Kiowa and Comanche counties since 1907. I am the 5th generation to carry on this legacy," Swanson said. "It's truly an honor to present young people, like Jake, who have deep, long standing ties to agriculture with scholarships to assist in furthering their education," said Jeff Jaronek, OCF Coordinator. "Working with partners like GoBob to help fund scholarships allows us to provide additional opportunities to young individuals who have strong roots in the cattle business that we otherwise might not be able to." The Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation was created to provide a charitable trust for the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association and Oklahoma Junior Cattlemen's Association. When you support the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation, you support beef cattle educational programs, research projects in cooperation with Oklahoma State University, educational scholarships for Oklahoma's 4-H and FFA youth and the preservation of the Oklahoma beef cattle industry and its traditions.

 

 

May 17th, 2016 Steel Prices Have Risen - Continuous Fencing

STEEL PRICES ALERT: CONTINUOUS FENCING PRICES TO INCREASE MAY 27TH


Tuesday, May 17th -
CONTINUOUS FENCER PANEL PRICES TO INCREASE FRIDAY MAY 27, 2016.

Steel Prices Rising!On March 28, a little over a month and a half ago, we notified all our customers that we had seen the writing on the wall that steel prices were headed up. While we are not perfect, that prediction has proven to be true. We have seen our raw material prices going up for three months now and we did not increase our prices.

At this point we can no longer afford to absorb the additional cost. This is why we are giving you advance notice that we must make an increase soon to remain viable.

GoBob pledges to honor all continuous fence orders placed and confirmed at present prices through Thursday May 26, 2016.

GoBob doesn't like these raising prices any better than you do; I hate it more that cattle prices aren't better.  But as you know, if we are in the cattle business, we have to have fences.

Regardless, we feel it is our duty to keep you informed regardless of market conditions. We appreciate your business and loyalty and will never take it for granted.

- Bob Studebaker
GoBob Pipe & Steel Sales

Call:  1-877-851-2365
email: deals@gobobpipe.com


March 28th, 2016 Steel Pricing on the Rise

STEEL PRICES ALERT!

Steel Prices Rising!You folks that have been our customers for a while know that we consider it part of our service to keep you informed about the steel markets so you can make better purchasing decisions.

One of the leading global energy, petrochemicals, metals and agricultural information sources is reporting that steel prices in India, Asia, China and now the U.S. are rising.

We got our own taste of it yesterday when one of our major mill suppliers notified us of a $70 per ton increase on future orders.

We would suggest that you, as a consumer, should consider making steel purchases now, for any corral expansion, fence building or even equipment purchases that you are planning in the near future while vendors, such as ourselves, have lower priced inventory in stock.

The consensus is that this increase is different because it is not, as of yet, demand driven. Most mills are only at 40 to 50% of their previous capacity. Because of down-sizing, cost cutting measures and other factors, however, this is their “new” 100%. The pressures bearing on mills worldwide include tariffs and even the worldwide terrorist’s threats. While most mills have already announced these prices increases the question becomes, will they stick?

We think yes. Some experts see this as a normal “rebalancing” following a downturn which was triggered by weak energy market demands and low price imports from China. In all fairness, however, there are some experts that think the up-trend is unlikely to continue. The bottom line for GoBob right now is that we feel fortunate we have the inventory that we have and do not have to make immediate price adjustments based on replacement costs!

If you would like to take advantage of existing steel prices, give us a call today!

Call:  1-877-851-2365
email: deals@gobobpipe.com


September, 2015 New Products in 2015 from GoBob Pipe & Steel

BIGGER, STRONGER, LASTS LONGER……

…..has always been the business model for GoBob Pipe & Steel.  “When we started this company in 2001,”says Bob Studebaker, managing member, “We had a choice.  We could either take the high road or the low road.  By that, I mean we could choose to see how cheap we could sell stuff or we could build heavy durable long lasting equipment. There is a market for both”.  GoBob obviously chose the high road as evidenced by the construction of the feeders, trailers and equipment they provide.  After successfully producing equipment that was common but in a heavier format, GoBob set their sights on bringing new innovative equipment to the market.  “Time is money and we recognize that if a rancher can work cattle quicker, haul hay faster, feed with less waste and have fewer breakdowns, he or she will have a healthier bottom line” states Studebaker.  “That’s why they are in business!”

While GoBob’s Hay Conserver, Hay Monster feeders and their Red Rhino trailers are already well known, GoBob strives to lead the industry in durable, time saving efficient equipment.  Several new products have been introduced by the company this year, as described by GoBob, including:

Mineral Beast Most mineral feeders are made out of wood, plastic, polyethylene or tin.  This construction is easily damaged by cattle stepping on them or even by their human masters moving them with a tractor.  Plus they are easily pushed around the pasture by mischievous cattle.  Most of them have a shipping weight of around 40 lbs.  The Mineral Beast is a heavy steel mineral feeder consisting of a 30”OD steel pie with a .312” thick side wall and a ¼” thick steel plate bottom.  The body is divided into two sections for two different types of mineral supplements.  A ½” thick rubber flap keeps out the rain & snow while the whole thing sits on skids that are made from 2”SQ .250” thick steel tubing to facilitate skidding the feeder since the weight of the unit, while discouraging cattle from pushing it around, does not allow the operator to manually pick it up to relocate it.  Approximate empty weight of the Mineral Beast feeder is 135 lbs. but it is also practically indestructible.

 

Cattle Flow Corner-less Tubsmany so called corner-less tubs can be found on the internet but few could be found that were truly without that pie shaped area that a cow can get their nose into and refuse to move.  It took three traveling gates to do it, but GoBob’s Cattle Flow Commander tubs are truly corner-less. 

Making them even more efficient is the 180 degree tub which comes with an additional escape gate that allows the cattle producer the option of sending the cow down the regular alley or sorting them out for another purpose with no wasted time or effort.  More importantly the Cattle Flow Commander tubs are one piece, coming fully assembled (no nuts & bolts to place), ready to work.  This all welded construction makes them more durable as well.  

 

Poke-N-Tote Single Bale TrailerAs arguably the largest supplier of hay trailers in the United States (if not the world) it only makes sense that GoBob should have a single bale mover to offer their customers.  Lots of them are on the market but they are mostly light weight, cheap construction. So we decided to make them better.  How?  Put more steel in them.  Make them stronger and more durable.  We believe, no we know, we have accomplished this goal.  The main structure of the Poke-N-Tote is 3” square tubing with a ¼” thick wall.  The Poke-N-Tote rides on Dexter EZ Lube hubs and new 205-75R15 steel radial tires.  These tires & wheels rate the hauling capacity at 3,640 lbs.  Well over the weight of any bale you may poke, then tote.  Loading is easy by poking your hay with a 1 ¾” 3000 lb. rated spear and two additional 1” spears keep the bale secure.  You will have many years of trouble-free service from this hay roll hauler, no matter how rough you are on it.

 

Monster FenceCattle pens that will last 100 years?  If anything will do it, it is Monster Fence.  Therefore, to get a fence this strong, a cattle producer had to forgo the convenience and speed of continuous fence panels and build the fence a stick at a time. 

GoBob was able to secure a relatively low cost pipe product, 2”OD .190 wall de-coiled pipe, and transform it into a continuous fence panel.  Available in 4 and 5 rail versions, graduated spacing of the rails keep the calves confined at the lower levels while containing larger cattle at the higher levels of the fence panel.  This efficiency saves the cattle producer money in both material costs and labor installation.



Portable Garage/ShopsGoBob has provided all steel livestock shelters for years that arrive assembled ready to use.  Extremely durable, several have survived nearby tornados while wood rot and warping is non-existent.  There is no doubt they are superior livestock shelters to the alternatives.  After constantly having requests to customize these shelters, however, for use as equipment or other type of storage, we decided to design a building specifically to be used as a shop or garage.  All models are 14 feet in width and you have a choice in length from 24 feet to 40 feet.  You pick the side wall height and the type and number of doors.  Exactly like the livestock shelters, they arrive ready to use, they do not normally add to your real estate tax base and are fully deductible the year you purchase them.  Additionally, since they are portable, you can sell them when you no longer need them or take them with you if you move.

 

Double Wide Hay TrailersAs such a large supplier of hay trailers, GoBob has had requests for years for a trailer that has a larger capacity than our inline trailers could provide.  Heretofore, doublewide hay trailers with widths out to 12 feet were considered over width loads on public thoroughfares.  During the recent drought years, however, several states legalized the use of such trailers to facilitate the movement of hay to drought stricken regions.  To satisfy their customer’s requests, GoBob contracted a proven manufacturer of doublewide hay trailers to build trailers with improved specifications, Better Built Trailers from Grainfield, KS.  Ten, twelve and fourteen bale models are available.  To improve safety and usability, all GoBob Better Built trailers include breakaway kits and two 12,000 lb. jacks.

 

Custom Cattle EquipmentMany, and we mean a lot, of cattle producers have unique situations where “standard” cattle equipment will not meet their needs.  These needs include certain widths or lengths required to fit into their existing space, number of exit and entry gates needed in chutes or alleys, direction in which they need their cattle to flow, the list is endless.  GoBob prides themselves on solving these problems and will customize almost any equipment to meet their customer’s needs.  Usually starting from a sketch and listening to what the customer wants to accomplish, these custom designs are transformed into 3D CAD prints the customer approves and finally into a finished manufactured product.

 

GoBob’s mission statement is to first; provide cattle equipment that meets their customer’s needs.  Second; to make these products efficient, saving time and making their customer’s money, and third; to build them bigger, stronger, last longer.    More information on GoBob products can be found at www.gobob.com or by requesting information at 1-877-851-2365.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association
Chancey Hanson | 405-743-7844 or chanson@okcattlemen.org


July 27th, 2015 Blassingame Receives Scholarship from GoBob Pipe & Steel

Blassingame Receives Scholarship from GoBob Pipe and Steel

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, July 27, 2015 – Annie Blassingame, Tecumseh, Okla. was awarded a $1,000 scholarship during the recent Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) Convention and Trade Show. This scholarship was funded by GoBob Pipe and Steel.

Blassingame, recently graduated from Tecumseh High School and plans to Oklahoma State University this fall. She plans to pursue a degree in Agricultural Communications.

“Annie was born into a fifth generation family owned and operated dairy,” said Charlie Swanson, OCA President. “She started showing beef cattle during high school and from that started her own herd of registered shorthorn beef cattle.”

Blassingame was highly involved in 4-H, FFA, Public Speaking, community organizations and volunteer efforts during high school while maintaining a high level of academic excellence. She is a forward thinker and has high aspirations to hold an elected office someday where she will work tirelessly to protect Oklahoma Agriculture, specifically beef producers.

“As a beef producer myself, we face the obvious challenges like weather, animal health, poorly educated consumers and market instability. But topping my list of challenges is an unfriendly environment of activist groups,” stated Blassingame. “I’m thankful that we have organizations like the OCA with very public and aggressive strategies to help promote and protect the interests of more than 55,000 Oklahoma farmers and ranchers.”

The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Foundation is proud of the partnership we have with GoBob Pipe and Steel and greatly appreciate them helping support the further education of young cattlemen such as Annie Blassingame.

The Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation was created to provide a charitable trust for the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association and Oklahoma Junior Cattlemen’s Association. When you support the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation, you support beef cattle educational programs, research projects in cooperation with Oklahoma State University, educational scholarships for Oklahoma's 4-H and FFA youth and the preservation of the Oklahoma beef cattle industry and its traditions.

# # #

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association
Chancey Hanson | 405-743-7844 or chanson@okcattlemen.org


July 27th, 2015 Strate Receives Scholarship from GoBob Pipe & Steel

Strate Receives Scholarship from GoBob Pipe and Steel

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, July 27, 2015 – Jarred Strate, Covington, Okla. was awarded a $1,000 scholarship during the recent Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) Convention and Trade Show. This scholarship was funded by GoBob Pipe and Steel.


Strate graduated from Garber High School in 2014. Following high school Strate completed the AWS Certified Welding Technology Program at Autry Technology Center and is currently attending Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology with expectations of completing the Natural Gas Compression Program in the summer of 2016.


“Jarred grew up on his family’s cattle operation near Covington, Okla., is a fourth generation cattleman and was involved in the Oklahoma Junior Cattlemen’s Association,” said Charlie Swanson, OCA President. “Like many young agricultural professionals, Jarred plans to continue his active role in his family’s cattle operation while working in his selected career path.”


Strate was highly involved in FFA, 4-H and several community organizations while in high school. He is currently involved in CareerTech student organizations and volunteer efforts while keeping a focus on maintaining a high level of academic excellence.


Scholarship applicants were asked what they viewed as the biggest challenges facing beef producers in the next five to ten years and here is Jarred’s reply.


“Cattle producers will need to find ways to provide safe, wholesome products with emphasis on environmentally sound practices that maintain the highest standards for animal well-being,” stated Strate. “Technology will play an important role in regards to electronic identification and record keeping as consumers demand for traceability through the food chain.”


The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Foundation is proud of the partnership we have with GoBob Pipe and Steel and greatly appreciate them helping support the further education of young cattlemen such as Jarred Strate.


The Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation was created to provide a charitable trust for the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association and Oklahoma Junior Cattlemen’s Association. When you support the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Foundation, you support beef cattle educational programs,
research projects in cooperation with Oklahoma State University, educational scholarships for Oklahoma's 4-H and FFA youth and the preservation of the Oklahoma beef cattle industry and its traditions.

# # #

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association
Chancey Hanson | 405-743-7844 or chanson@okcattlemen.org


March, 2015 Oil Price Drop Benefits Ranchers - BUT THE WINDOW IS CLOSING!

Oil Price Drop Benefits Ranchers in more ways than one...
BUT THE WINDOW IS CLOSING!

The obvious benefit in the recent drop in oil prices is substantially lower fuel cost when we fill up our pickups and tractors. It’s also pushing steel pipe prices lower, but time is limited.

Any type of political hiccup or change in attitude in the Middle East can drive oil prices back up overnight; your other concern, time is limited to take advantage of lower steel prices is this:
Drops are a double edged sword. The oil field is arguably the largest consumer of pipe in our country, as pipe is used both to drill and complete wells. The oil price collapse has most mills that specialize in oil country tubular products either shutting down or have vast excess capacity. Consequently; any time supply exceeds demand, regardless the commodity, prices drop. The odd fact that affects ranchers like us using pipe for our fences and corrals, we rely on these same mills to produce the reject and secondary pipe that we depend on. Therefore, the availability of this pipe is rapidly drying up. Soon, very soon the demand will exceed the supply and pipe prices will rise.

Don’t count on used pipe to supply our market, either. Those of you that know me or follow my blogs know that I think using used pipe in corrals and fences is a huge mistake; but that is a whole other subject. However, what we know having experienced this before: oil field operators will re-use their used pipe more, rather than purchasing new in order to save money. This means that by the time that used pipe is released into our market it is totally worn out, used up. I would not use it if it were given to me; but that’s just me.

Are you planning on building or expanding your fencing & corrals in the next year?
Now is the time to stock up! I honestly feel pipe prices are at the low end of the spectrum.
That’s what my crystal ball says anyway.

- Bob Studebaker

 

August, 2014 GoBob Gives Back - KLA's Beef Fest - 5K Run Donation

Late August marked the dates for the 28th annual Flint Hills Beef Fest, featuring a host of events. One such event, a 5K Run titled "Run for the Brand" is known for welcoming serious runners and walkers alike. GoBob was asked to help with this fundraiser; we donated some of our cattle equipment to the cause. While we were at the event we captured some photos to share!

 

   
   
January, 2014 John Aden is our 4th quarter
2013 PREFERRED CLUB WINNER! Exciting 2014 Preferred Club Plans...

 

John Aden is our 4th quarter 2013 PREFERRED CLUB WINNER!

John Aden of Arkansas is the winner of a Hay Monster feeder for 4th quarter of 2013 if they contact us in the next 10 days!  

How did they win it?  They just gave us their contact information and they were automatically entered in our quarterly drawing.  No muss, no fuss.   All they have to do now is open this email and pick up the phone and claim their prize!

Preferred Club members consist of people that have given us their contact information.  They also get notified of specials and sales before the general public and sometimes they are offered discounts for members only but he icing on the cake is ONLY these members are eligible for prizes given four times each year.

 

Go Bob Pipe presents our first 2014 Preferred Club Winner!Now we have exciting news for 2014:

The winner of the first drawing for 2014 will win an awesome vacation including resort hotel accommodations for a week!

Subject to availability, our next winner will be able to choose from beautiful destinations like the Stormy Point Village in Branson, MO., the White Oak Lodge & Resort in Gatlinburg, TN. or even the Mayan Palace Resort in the Riviera Maya Cancun, Mexico!

In the past the awards have always been a GoBob product.  We want to hear what you think of this new direction (vacations) so we can determine if we will continue it.  Go to our Facebook Page, Google+ or Twitter and tell us what you think!

     

 

 

December, 2013 GoBob Gives Back - "GoBob Scholarship" Awarded by the Kansas Livestock Foundation

 

Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – December 9, 2013

WOODBURY EARNS CATTLEMEN’S SCHOLARSHIP

            (WICHITA) – Evan Woodbury of Quenemo, son of Howard and Elise Woodbury, was awarded the $2,500 Cattlemen’s Scholarship from GoBob Pipe & Steel and the Kansas Livestock Foundation (KLF). The scholarship was awarded at the Kansas Livestock Association (KLA) annual convention, December 6, in Wichita. Woodbury was one of 14 students awarded a grand total of $16,000 in scholarships through KLF.

            The West Franklin High School graduate assists with his family’s cattle operation and owns his own registered Angus cow-calf herd. He was very active in his local FFA chapter and 4-H club, serving as president of both organizations. Woodbury is a member of the National Junior Angus Association and Kansas Junior Angus Association. He served as District 2 director of the state organization. Woodbury is attending Kansas State University and majoring in agricultural education. He is a member of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity, Block and Bridle, Agriculture Ambassadors and treasurer of the College of Agriculture Student Council.

            Funding for the Cattlemen’s Scholarship is generated through the purchase of GoBob Pipe & Steel products by KLA members. The company donates a percentage of all member purchases to KLF. Additional funds for the scholarship were generated through the auction of two Haymonster Hay Feeders, donated by GoBob, at the 2013 KLA Convention. GoBob is a distributor of farming supplies, such as steel pipe and gates, corral and fence materials and heavy-duty equipment.

            KLF was established in 1983 to operate solely and exclusively for charitable, scientific and educational purposes. For information about KLF’s scholarship offerings or to receive an application, contact the foundation at 6031 S.W. 37th St., Topeka, KS 66614 or email letty@kla.org.

            KLA is a trade organization protecting the business interests of independent ranchers and feeders. Members of the association are involved in all segments of the livestock industry, including cow-calf production, backgrounding, cattle feeding, swine, dairy and sheep. The association’s work is funded by the voluntary dues dollars paid by its 5,500 members.

 

 

   
August, 2012 GoBob Gives Back - Wildfire Assistance, 2012

 

For over 10 days, residents of Oklahoma battled raging wildfires causing distruction across several counties. As reports from victims and customers came in, GoBob put into action a Wildfire Assistance Program, that benefited multiple families and farms in devistated areas. In total, GoBob Pipe would bring over $10,000 in aid to bear, helping to put lives and families back on track.

Below are photos of some of the families GoBob was privileged to help in their times of need.

 

Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary
Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary
Oklahoma Wildfire Assistance Program Beneficiary
   
August, 2012 Andy Brown

How to Survive the Drought and Prosper

Farmers and ranchers who adapt to survive the worst drought in generations will profit
from higher commodity prices and less competition

With drought conditions the worst since the 1930s, most farmers and ranchers are cutting back, tightening their belts, and looking at all possible ways to cut their costs. With 2012 on track to be the hottest year recorded in the U.S. and drought affecting over 60% of the lower 48 states, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently estimated that 54% of the nation's pasture and rangeland was in poor to very poor condition.

As a severe shortage of grass, hay, and corn is raising feed prices, many farmers and ranchers are desperately deciding whether they can afford to continue feeding their cattle, or to give up and sell off large parts of their herd. But with a cattle sell off creating a buyers market and driving down prices, many may regret shrinking their herd once the drought passes – when they will have to pay top dollar to replace cattle, if they decide to ramp up production.

"When the market is flooded with cattle, you don't get much for selling your herd," says Wade Rains, who manages 200 head of mama cows on 600 acres at the 4B Ranch in Bristow, Oklahoma. "Just like the stock market, you want to buy low and sell high. If you can hold out, now is not the time to sell. We're buying cattle when others are selling low. We're maximizing our resources and productivity to hold down costs, and plan to profit after the sell off when cattle prices rebound."

For farmers and ranchers like Rains who adapt to the drought, this crisis can actually be an opportunity. Those who take advantage of proven new equipment and methods to work more efficiently and productively will not only be more profitably competitive during the drought when commodity prices rise, but also after the drought when there is less competition in the marketplace. Many are finding ways to cut hay use by 30% or more, and slash labor costs. They are also taking advantage of eligibility for federal aid, including low-interest emergency loans, in half of the nation's counties which are now deemed disaster areas due to the drought.

To stretch resources, Rains has tried nearly everything. He has opened 4B Ranch's gates and allowed the cattle to free-range its pastures to find what they can. He has trucked in cheaper hay from out of state. While reserving his best herd to calve out and selling the calves, he has bought older, heavy bred cows ready to calve and kept them a few months.

He lets these calve out, sells the calves, then sells the cows back. "One of the main ways that we've been able to stretch our feed is through GoBob Hay Conserver feeders," says Rains. "We used to throw our bales on the ground, but the cattle would knock hay off the bales, trample it, foul it, wallow in it, and waste it." GoBob Pipe and Steel, an Oklahoma-based farm and ranch supplier, first introduced "Hay Conserver" feeders about six years ago, and has since shipped over 9,000 of the feeders across the U.S.

To reduce waste, "conserver" hay feeders force cattle to place their heads through metal bars to get at the hay. Any feed the cows drop falls back into the feeder where it can be eaten later.

"With the Hay Conserver feeders, cattle can eat what need but don't waste the hay," says Rains. "We went from putting out several bales every day in each of our pastures to doing so every two or three days. We're using about 40 percent less hay to feed the same number of cows, which is helping us to survive the drought."

"Since we're putting out bales less often, we're also saving gas, labor, and vehicle wear and tear," adds Rains. "Because we're not driving as much, we have less soil compaction. This allows our pastures to grow out and stretches our pasture grazing. For a little more than the cost of knock-off lightweight 'hay saving' feeders, we expect to get several times more life out of our heavy-duty Hay Conserver feeders. This will save us unnecessary replacement costs in future droughts."

By switching to more efficient GoBob cattle working equipment, Rains is also able to handle the workload of the 4B Ranch as its only full-time employee, saving the labor cost of several day workers for many operations. Cutting the cost of labor to the bone has helped the 4B Ranch to absorb the higher cost of feed during the prolonged drought.

"In our old alley, I'd need one man pushing the calves and cows to keep them from turning around and crowding up," says Rains. In our old makeshift crowding tub, we needed an extra man to get in there and push the cows, and someone pushing the gate since it didn't always latch. Our old squeeze chute was a lot of manual labor. We needed someone to open the gate. While one man squeezed down the cow, another man ran the head chute."

"We've found that the GoBob adjustable alleys speed up the process tremendously, and keep the cattle from turning around," explains Rains. "We can go from working a 2,000 lbs. bull, to a 1,500 lbs. cow, to a 60 lbs. calf. You can squeeze them right along without having to get in there and mess with them."

Rains has found that a more labor-efficient crowding tub has similar benefits to the 4B Ranch's cattle working operations. "The gate adjusts so you don't have to get down inside," says Rains. "You can do everything from outside. Just stand to the side, tie a rope on the crowding tub and pull it around. You never have to get down, move around, and chase gates. It's way simpler to run and you don't have a bunch of cattle circling around."

Using a squeeze chute with rear controls, Rains finds that one man can smoothly run the chute with levers, instead of the two to three men required previously. "Now I stand at the back of the squeeze chute, open the gate, run the cow in, and squeeze her off. It takes the work and labor cost out of it."

"Farmers and ranchers worried about the high cost of seed and feed during the long drought will find that a new types of machinery will radically cut the cost of labor and quickly pay for themselves," says Bob Studebaker, president of GoBob Pipe and Steel.

"If labor weren't a concern, farms would still be using scythe-wielding farm help, and combines would never have been invented." For instance, a new piece of equipment called the Accumulator is designed to allow one man to clear and accumulate an entire field of hay in a fraction of the time traditionally required. When used with an accompanying grapple, one person can rake, bale, accumulate, load, and store a 5-7 acre tract in a single day.

The Accumulator can gather 10 bales of hay into one row and convert it in a few minutes, allowing custom accumulating of square bales that have already been baled on the ground. It hooks behind any square baler in seconds without using pumps or tractor hydraulics. Just run a baler, hook the Accumulator to the back where it will neatly situate the bales. Then return with the grapple, hook to the bales, and load 10 bales at a time. With such equipment, one man can put 350 bales on a trailer in less than an hour, or 250 bales per hour in the barn.

"Another innovative hay saving, labor saving piece of equipment is called the 2EZ Hydraulic Bale Mover," adds Studebaker. "With this, one person can load, unload, and move up to six large round bales without breakage or loss, and never get out of their truck or tractor. Since its design keeps a single side of the bale in contact with the ground, it also saves hay by minimizing the number of bad hay spots caused by ground-absorbed moisture."

The system uses a "power up, gravity down" design, with massive hydraulic cylinders to lift the rails to traveling height. When needed, the rails drop back down using only the force of gravity. A "lock out" system prevents the possibility of dropping hay too soon. Some farmers and ranchers find they can dramatically improve productivity with the equipment if their wife hauls baled hay in a pick up-pulled trailer while they bale hay with the tractor. This can remove the bottleneck of waiting for one person to do all the work with a single tractor.

Ultimately, the best advice to survive this drought and the next one may be to think creatively and find a supplier who knows farm and ranch supplies inside out, who can help to optimize resources, performance, productivity, and value.

GoBob Pipe and Steel offers a complete selection of quality feeders, fencing, hay trailers, pipe and guards, designed to help farmers and ranchers save money and labor by working better and more efficiently.

For more information, contact GoBob Pipe and Steel at 1-866-532-9123

   
February, 2012 GoBob Gives Back - Shriners, 2012

Every Year, GoBob gives so that disadvantaged children can experience Shriners Circus. This year GoBob took care of 100 children.

The Shriners fund and operate hospitals all over the nation for crippled children. Their circuses benefit children in two ways:  Disadvantaged children get to attend the circus, while the circus it's self helps fund the hospitals.   These photos document this year's experience.

   
February, 2012 Cattle Today
Article Link

ADVANCES SAVE ON WASTED FEED COSTS AND TIME 

Drought conditions in regions throughout North America have placed a great deal of pressure on cattle ranchers and dairy farmers, particularly in regards to the cost and availability of hay this winter. In many areas they are faced with a pressing choice: either stretch existing supplies of hay or supplement with additional hay purchased on the open market at inflated prices due to the shortages.

Fortunately, new and improved hay feeder and bunk designs are going a long way toward maximizing on-hand stocks of hay so they can last through the winter.

This includes the recent availability of square hay bale feeders (previous options were limited to smaller round bales) designed to conserve up to 33 percent of existing hay resources, new heavy steel feed bunks that are an economical alternative to plastic and concrete and even new shipping techniques designed to drive down freight costs, which are passed on to the farmer.

Saving on feed spillage

Using conventional hay feeding rings, cattle ranchers can lose thousands of dollars per year in avoidable feed loss.

With traditional feeding rings, cattle stand outside the feeder, tear the hay out, and let the excess fall from their mouths. When cattle bite off too much, which they are inclined to do, the hay falls to the ground and gets trampled and otherwise damaged – and will not be eaten.

“Conserver” hay feeders, on the other hand, force cattle to place their heads through metal bars to get at the hay. Any feed the cows drop falls right back into the feeder where it can be eaten later.

The success of the hay conserving bale feeder has led to the recent development and release of new options that accommodate the large square bales popular throughout the Northwest. Large square bales are also popular for feeding dairy cattle in places such as Wisconsin, California and southern Missouri.

“Until recently, there have been no hay conserver feeders available on the market that accommodated the large square bales,” says Bob Studebaker, president of GoBob Pipe and Steel, the supplier that first introduced “Hay Conserver” feeders about six years ago and has subsequently shipped over 9,000 feeders across the United States. “The square feeders are based on the same principles, so a farmer can save roughly a third of his existing hay resources as well as the time, trouble and cost of locating and transporting additional hay.”

According to Studebaker, hay feeder suppliers such as GoBob are increasingly searching for ways to reduce the overall cost through creative solutions to reduce freight costs. One option is to have feeders shipped partially assembled and unpainted in kits, rather than fully assembled. Strategically located fabricators throughout the country would then handle the final assembly and painting. Customers and dealers can even elect to finish the assembly and painting themselves at a further discount.

“Shipping is a substantial cost that affects the overall cost of the product,” explains Studebaker. “Instead of shipping 25 completed feeders on a semi, we can ship about four times that many in kit form. This significantly reduces shipping costs, so that they can be passed on to the customer.”

Feed bunks

The other option for feeding cattle is feed bunks. Like the hay feeder, there are important considerations that go into the selection of bunk, its construction and how to avoid unnecessary feed waste.

A typical feed bunk from a feed store or farm supply center is 8-10 feet long, has a light tubular frame and a plastic trough. Plastic bunks are relatively inexpensive at $110-$150.

Unfortunately, because they weigh about 50 lbs, cattle can push plastic bunks around the yard. If livestock inadvertently step into the trough they can punch a hole right through the plastic. The cost of replacing damaged bunks over time eliminates much of the savings from the initial purchase price.

The alternative to plastic is concrete. However, concrete bunks require substantial, regular maintenance. Because concrete is porous, it must be sealed on a periodic basis. If not, concrete will spall or chip. Concrete bunks have the additional disadvantage of being so heavy and cumbersome that it is very difficult to move them when necessary.

“Concrete bunks usually weigh a couple of tons and require a tractor to move them,” Studebaker explains. “Plus, if you move them in the winter they can crack, which will allow moisture to get in and freeze. If the bunk ruptures, then it requires repair or replacement.”

A highly efficient and practical alternative to plastic and concrete pasture bunks is the “half pipe” metal feeding bunk. Constructed of a 20 foot metal pipe split in half, these feed bunks are plated to seal the ends, with metal legs welded underneath to provide highly durable legs. The product is also available by the foot for constructing long, fence line bunk systems.

These metal bunks feature a trough that is 5/16-3/8 in. thick, making them virtually indestructible. At a little over 1,000 pounds, they are too heavy for cattle to move, but easy enough for the farmer. Although heavy steel bunks cost about 30 percent more than plastic, cattlemen never have to replace them.

In addition to standard metal bunks, there are high-volume “super bunk” models that are designed for those that feed cattle ground hay, silage or other high volume forage.

Constructed of steel plate, instead of a half-pipe, the trough is 34 in. wide and 12 in. deep. To ensure that feed and supplements will not get trapped into square edges or corners and wasted, the sides of the trough are sloped inward toward the bottom. The high-volume bunk also features skids and a tow bar, making it easily transported around the pasture.

Whether bunk or hay feeder, cattle ranchers and dairy farmers would do well to examine the latest options that can help them stretch existing feed resources and eliminate shortfalls that will force them to purchase additional hay at today's inflated prices.

   
February 9th, 2012 Progressive Dairy
Hay Saving Article Link

Stretching available hay resources this winter


Weather conditions in regions throughout North America have placed a great deal of pressure on cattle ranchers and dairy farmers, particularly in regards to the cost and availability of hay this winter.

In many areas they are faced with a pressing choice: either stretch existing supplies of hay or supplement with additional hay purchased on the open market at inflated prices due to the shortages.

Fortunately, new and improved hay feeder and bunk designs are going a long way toward maximizing on-hand stocks of hay so they can last through the winter.

This includes the recent availability of square hay bale feeders (previous options were limited to smaller round bales) designed to conserve up to 33 percent of existing hay resources, new heavy steel feedbunks that are an economical alternative to plastic and concrete and even new shipping techniques designed to drive down freight costs, which are passed on to the farmer.

Saving on feed spillage
Using conventional hay feeding rings, cattle ranchers can lose thousands of dollars per year in avoidable feed loss.

With traditional feeding rings, cattle stand outside the feeder, tear the hay out and let the excess fall from their mouths.

When cattle bite off too much, which they are inclined to do, the hay falls to the ground and gets trampled and otherwise damaged – and will not be eaten.

“Conserver” hay feeders, on the other hand, force cattle to place their heads through metal bars to get at the hay. Any feed the cows drop falls right back into the feeder, where it can be eaten later.

The success of the hay-conserving bale feeder has led to the recent development and release of new options that accommodate the large square bales..

“Until recently, there have been no hay-conserver feeders available on the market that accommodated the large square bales,” says Bob Studebaker, president of GoBob Pipe and Steel, the supplier that first introduced “Hay Conserver” feeders about six years ago and has subsequently shipped over 9,000 feeders.

“The square feeders are based on the same principles, so a farmer can save roughly a third of his existing hay resources as well as the time, trouble and cost of locating and transporting additional hay.”

According to Studebaker, hay feeder suppliers are increasingly searching for ways to reduce the overall cost through creative solutions to reduce freight costs.

One option is to have feeders shipped partially assembled and unpainted in kits, rather than fully assembled. Strategically located fabricators throughout the country would then handle the final assembly and painting.

Customers and dealers can even elect to finish the assembly and painting themselves at a further discount.

“Shipping is a substantial cost that affects the overall cost of the product,” explains Studebaker. “Instead of shipping 25 completed feeders on a semi, we can ship about four times that many in kit form.

This significantly reduces shipping costs, so they can be passed on to the customer.”

Feedbunks
The other option for feeding cattle is feedbunks. Like the hay feeder, there are important considerations that go into the selection of bunk, its construction and how to avoid unnecessary feed waste.

A typical feedbunk from a feed store or farm supply center is eight to 10 feet long, has a light tubular frame and a plastic trough. Plastic bunks are relatively inexpensive at $110 to $150.

Unfortunately, because they weigh about 50 pounds, cattle can push plastic bunks around the yard. If livestock inadvertently step into the trough, they can punch a hole right through the plastic.

The cost of replacing damaged bunks over time eliminates much of the savings from the initial purchase price.

The alternative to plastic is concrete. However, concrete bunks require substantial, regular maintenance. Because concrete is porous, it must be sealed on a periodic basis.

If not, concrete will spall or chip. Concrete bunks have the additional disadvantage of being so heavy and cumbersome that it is very difficult to move them when necessary.

“Concrete bunks usually weigh a couple of tons and require a tractor to move them,” Studebaker explains. “Plus, if you move them in the winter they can crack, which will allow moisture to get in and freeze.If the bunk ruptures, then it requires repair or replacement.”

A highly efficient and practical alternative to plastic and concrete pasture bunks is the “half pipe” metal feeding bunk.

Constructed of a 20-foot metal pipe split in half, these feedbunks are plated to seal the ends, with metal legs welded underneath to provide highly durable legs.The product is also available by the foot for constructing long, fenceline bunk systems.

These metal bunks feature a trough that is 5/16 – 3/8 of an inch thick, making them virtually indestructible. At a little over 450 kilograms, they are too heavy for cattle to move but easy enough for the farmer.

Although heavy steel bunks cost about 30 percent more than plastic, cattlemen never have to replace them.

In addition to standard metal bunks, there are high-volume “super bunk” models designed for those that feed cattle ground hay, silage or other high-volume forage.

Constructed of steel plate, instead of a half-pipe, the trough is 34 inches wide and 12 inches deep. To ensure feed and supplements will not get trapped into square edges or corners and wasted, the sides of the trough are sloped inward toward the bottom. The high-volume bunk also features skids and a tow bar, making it easily transported around the pasture.

 

Whether bunk or hay feeder, cattle ranchers and dairy farmers would do well to examine the latest options that can help them stretch existing feed resources and eliminate shortfalls that will force them to purchase additional hay at today’s inflated prices.

 

 

   
August 29th, 2011 Progressive Cattleman
Hay Trailer Article Link

2EZ Bale Mover with new Hydraulic Bumper Pull

Square Bale Hay Conserving Hay Bale Feeder

GoBob Pipe and Steel's 2EZ Bale Mover is a "never get out of your vehicle" trailer capable of loading, hauling and dumping bales up to 2,500 pounds up to six at a time with only a truck or tractor.

Now the 2EZ Bale Mover is available with a hydraulic bumper pull that works interchangeably with tractor or pickup to speed loading and improve ground clearance over previously available attachment options.

The 2EZ Hay Hauler features two rails that descend under precise control to ground level.

Simply back up with a tractor or truck to slide the rails under bales one at a time or several at once.

The system uses a "power up, gravity down" design, with massive hydraulic cylinders to lift the rails to traveling height.

When needed, the rails drop back down using only the force of gravity. An ingenious "lockout" system prevents the possibility of dropping hay before you're ready.

For more information on GoBob Pipe and Steel's 2EZ Hay Hauler, call (866) 532-9123 or visit www.gobobpipe.com

 

 

 

 

September 21st, 2010 Grass And Grain

Cattle Ranchers cut back on Hay Costs during Winter Feeding

Square Bale Hay Conserving Hay Bale Feeder
Freddie Davis, a rancher-farmer in Royse City, Texas, faced a problem common to many. "I wasn't going to have enough hay to make it through the winter. I was going to have to buy about $6,000 worth of hay to make up the shortfall."

Like many ranchers that have found themselves squeezed in recent years by outside forces — from drought and a weak economy to rising oil and grain prices – Davis, who owns 75 head of mixed-breed cattle, wanted better control of his input costs, especially the hay his cows wasted eating from traditional hay rings each winter. The problem with a hay ring is that cattle stand outside the feeder, tear the hay out, and let the excess fall from their mouths. When cattle bite off too much, as they are inclined to do, the waste falls to the ground, gets trampled and otherwise damaged – and will not be eaten. Davis found a solution in a new type of square hay bale feeder, designed to keep cows from tearing out the hay and wasting it.

"A square hay bale feeder has metal bars that cows must stick their heads through to get to the hay bale inside," explains Bob Studebaker, owner of GoBob Pipe and Steel, an innovative farm supplier that first introduced its original Hay Conserver square hay bale feeder to market about six years ago. "With the hay bale inside, cows have to commit their heads inside and stay there while they eat. They won't go in, get a bite, and back out. They stay in the feeder, so anything that drops out of their mouths stays in the feeder, which they eat later."

"When I called Bob of GoBob, I bought his Hay Conserver with a 30-day guarantee that I'd use at least 25% less hay," says Davis. "It worked, so I bought a few more. When they made my hay last that first winter, they quickly paid for themselves. Since then, I've cut my hay consumption by a third each winter."

Since Davis's cows waste so much less hay in winter, he finds himself making fewer trips to the barn and pasture to put out hay bales. "I'm saving a couple hours a week each winter putting out less hay because the cows waste less," says Davis. "It lets me get to everything else that needs to be done that much faster."

About five years after buying his square hay bale feeders, Davis says, "They're still holding up well and have years of life left in them."

John Rummel and his wife, who run a 250-acre ranch with 70 registered Limousin cows in Ash Grove, Missouri, were also tired of the hay wasted by traditional hay rings. In fact, they even had difficulty getting their big 5'x6' bales to fit in their hay rings, which typically left "at least two feet of bale sticking out of the top." The cows would eat out under the hay bale, and big chunks of bale would fall out of the ring and get trampled, making a mess, according to Rummel.

"When my wife found what looked like half a hay bale lying on the ground, she got so upset she said, 'We've got to do something,'" says Rummel. "What made it worse is that our cows were wasting about a third of the clean barn-kept hay we gave them."

While there's an ample supply of square hay bale feeders on the market today, not all are created equal. Rummel says some of the square hay bale feeders he's looked at would be hard to fit his big 5'x6' bales in. "If the feeder is too small, the cows may not be able to fit their heads inside," says Rummel. "If it's too tight, they'd pull their heads out along with the hay, and drop it outside where it'd go to waste."

Some square hay bale feeders, in fact, are as small as 6'x6' at the top, which would be a tight squeeze for a big bale. Others use thinner gauge pipe, which may not be built to withstand years of hungry, pushy cows or harsh, winter weather. Some however, like GoBob's newest feeders guarantee that animals won't tear them up, are tested to hold over 15,000 lbs., have up to a 10-year warranty, and even guarantee up to 30% hay savings.

Hay Conserver FeederAt the time, however, Rummel was more than pleased when he bought several square hay bale feeders from GoBob. "When my cows reach their heads in to feed, their heads stay in and they clean up all the hay," says Rummel. They just don't waste hay, so I can put out about 30 to 35% less." While Rummel typically put out bales in his hay ring every day with his tractor, he finds he can now put them out about every other day in his square hay bale feeders. "I'm saving time, money, and gas because I don't have to restock the bales so often," he says. "I can stay warm in the house on cold winter days, and in bad weather. It makes things easier when I don't have to feed them so much."

Since the cows are nottearing out and trampling his clean, barn-kept hay, it stays nice and fresh where they can get at it whenever they want. "The cows just go to the square bale Hay Conservers. They work so well I got rid of my hay rings." As market uncertainty leads many ranchers, dairy farmers, and even farm equipment dealers to control input costs, the growing popularity of square hay bale feeders has proven there's a market for conserving hay. But as circumstances change, the market and design of square hay bale feeders cannot stand still.

Studebaker explains, "We were one of the first to offer a hay conserving feeder and the first to offer a square-shaped feeder for round bales. We were the first to offer a 25% hay savings guarantee. But that's not enough. Like the ranchers, dairy farmers, and others we serve, we have to innovate and keep improving the tools they use."

With an improved design, GoBob now guarantees 30% hay savings on its latest square bale Hay Conservers. The company also offers double bale, along with larger, stronger versions for bulls and horned cattle. New skid corners also allow them to be dragged almost anywhere. For more info, call 1-877-851-2365 or visit www.gobobpipe.com

 

Look at what Ozark Farm & Neighbor and Joe Hardcastle
has to say about Hay Conserver Feeders from GoBob!

March 6th, 2009 Ozark Farm and Neighbor

The Best Way He’s Found to Feed
By Laura L. Valenti, OFN Contributor

Joe Hardcastle - Gobob Pipe and Steel Customer and Hay Conserver Bale Feeder OwnerJoe Hardcastle on the best way he’s found to feed his Angus and Brangus crossed with horned Hereford cattle: Using GoBob’s hay feeders

When Joe Hardcastle took home a new insert for his GoBob hay feeders, he did not expect to be quite as impressed as he was. “I saw them at a Springfield show and brought one home to try,” he stated while standing in his barn, surrounded by trucks from his main business, JH Excavating. “After working with their demonstrator, I liked it so well, I immediately ordered four more.”

As Bob Studebaker, owner of GoBob Feeders explained, “we were one of the first to offer a hay conserving feeder and the first to offer a square-shaped feeder for round bales. Sometimes something new is difficult to get accepted by the public so we offered an unconditional money back guarantee, if the customer did not feed 25 percemt less hay than they were previously feeding with a ring feeder. This winter (2008-2009) we have surpassed over 6,000 feeders sold since its inception. We now confidently offer the same money back guarantee and have upped the anty to 30 percent less hay fed. Joe Hardcastle was the very first to purchase one and then called back to
order more.”ay Conserver Bale Feeder with Bull and Cattle

“I run about 140 cattle, on three different pieces of property,” Joe Hardcastle continued. “I came to
Lebanon 40 years ago, working in the lumber industry, and now I run this.” He waved an arm to take in the lot in front of the barn, filled with trucks of varying sizes and descriptions, all associated with excavation and construction. “I grew up on a farm in Ozark County, along the Missouri- Arkansas line. I did 4-H as a kid, and that life is something I’ve always loved. My wife,” he laughed. “She doesn’t care for the cows, but I do.” Sherrill Hardcastle runs her own monogramming business, all on the same property as Joe’s excavating business and the majority of his cattle. “This is a hobby that I love. That’s the best way I can describe it,” Joe continued. “I moved to Lebanon from Springfield in 1969 and worked in the lumber yards for 26 years. You know, you’d go to work every day, with all the hustle, and have people yelling at you about this or that, but then to come home and work with the cows, now to me, that’s relaxing. The only problem now, with these cell phones, is that they can find you anywhere, even out in the field. The only way you can truly find any peace is if you shut this thing off,” he added, as he pulled his cell phone out of his coveralls front pocket. He shook his head, with a smile. “I run a Brangus-Angus mix and breed them to horned Hereford bulls, which I get out of Kansas, and that gets you black baldy calves. I’ve been doing it that way for years. I feed straight hay in the winter, with salt mineral range cubes and they winter real well that way. And the GoBob feeders, all I can say is that they really do save on the hay. There’s not a lot of money in the cattle these days, but well, they really are my therapy at the end of the day.”

 



Look at what the State Journal Newspaper in Frankfort, Kentucky
has to say about continuous fence from GoBob!

Sunday, June 10, 2007 The State Journal, Frankfort, KY


WESTERN U.S. 'continuous' fence idea worthwhile in Kentucky
by Keenan Bishop, Agriculture Extention Agent

Cattleman Buddy Smith looks on as Carl Willard of Peach Lumber loads his order of continuous metal pipe fence. The Cattleman's Association went together to fill a semi trailer for a discounted price.

One benefit of being a Cattlemen's Association member is the trips taken to other parts of the state and nation to see various aspects of farming and livestock production. One develops a better understanding of the food system, makes networking connections and learns new tips and ideas.

The trips out west have had several members curious about their continuous fencing system. Seems that the oil boom created miles of used steel pipe that was surplused. Since farmers are innovative by nature, they were soon transforming the pipe sections in to fence.

This recycled product made for strong, long lasting animal containment, especially around corrals and handling facilities.

Local cattlemen figured that the fence, which usually comes in 20' sections and couples together for "continuous" fence, would be ideal for handling facilities here.

The sections come in various heights and pipe diameters. They are either welded to steel posts or clipped to wooden posts. Out west they may or may not be painted but they also have much less rainfall than we do (except for this past May, the 11th driest on record!).

Local Cattleman Kerry Redding was looking for a source and discovered GoBob Pipe and Steel in Oklahoma (http://www.gobobpipe.com).

The association made contact with Bob Studebaker, owner of GoBob Pipe and Steel, who was very helpful and explained the history and uses of continuous fence.

After discussing the options and potential, the Association was able to work out a group buy.

By joining for a group order, 14 cattlemen were able to get a discount on the fence, gates and feed bunks they would use in their farm operation.

When Bob was asked the lifespan on the panels his remark was "I couldn't tell you, they've only been making them for a little over 30 years." No longer are used drill pipe utilized, but brand new pipe instead. The final product is an attractive, long lasting and practical fence. When you consider that it may never need replacement, then it becomes much cheaper than wood or wire.

Another local member, Charlie Jones, worked with Brad Peach to help facilitate the delivery.

Brad Peach of Peach Lumber was gracious enough to allow the association the use of his forklift, lumber yard, and employees to unload over 45,000 pounds of fence systems from the semi.

The Peach employees went out of their way to accommodate the group order and assist the farmers with sorting and unloading.

This bulk buy would have been impossible if not for the efforts of the Peach family.

Some of you who have traveled west may be familiar with this type of fence. Those that haven't seen it and are curious can see it in operation at this years Field Day on July 12 at the Mucci Farm in Woodlake.

The Muccis will have it installed along crowding alleys and other areas that receive heavy livestock pressure.

Be sure to mark your calendar for the Field Day to see this as well as other interesting educational stops.

 

 

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